Rocking red lips for the lover.

Rocking red lips for the lover.

Am currently sitting in the cosiest cafe, Stofan kaffihus, in the heart of Reykjavik. I have had two perfect lattes, and the music has included Diana Ross & The Supremes, Air, El Perro Del Mar, and now the best of Elvis. I am writing this because I never, ever, ever want to forget this moment. I am so content. So happy. On my own, and so happy.

Am currently sitting in the cosiest cafe, Stofan kaffihus, in the heart of Reykjavik. I have had two perfect lattes, and the music has included Diana Ross & The Supremes, Air, El Perro Del Mar, and now the best of Elvis. I am writing this because I never, ever, ever want to forget this moment. I am so content. So happy. On my own, and so happy.

Snow bunny!

Snow bunny!

bluexeyes:

hellanne: (by Javier Andrés)

(via jennifer-rose00)

To Scandinavia :)

wnycradiolab:

National Geographic “Pictures We Love” 

When David Guttenfelder showed us the pictures he shot for “Last Song for Migrating Birds,” a story about how poachers coat tree branches with glue to trap migrating songbirds, I was horrified.
Who would want to eat a sweet little oriole? And how could there possibly be enough meat to make the effort worthwhile? It would be one thing if people need the birds to subsist, but that’s mostly not the case­­. These birds are considered delicacies that people pay a lot of money for.
So when David projected this image of a man with the wing of a blackcap in his lips, I braced myself for a gruesome story about how the man ate the bird live. Instead, David told us, the man was actually a conservationist sucking the sticky sap from the wings of a bird that had been stuck in a glue trap.

wnycradiolab:

National Geographic “Pictures We Love”

When David Guttenfelder showed us the pictures he shot for “Last Song for Migrating Birds,” a story about how poachers coat tree branches with glue to trap migrating songbirds, I was horrified.

Who would want to eat a sweet little oriole? And how could there possibly be enough meat to make the effort worthwhile? It would be one thing if people need the birds to subsist, but that’s mostly not the case­­. These birds are considered delicacies that people pay a lot of money for.

So when David projected this image of a man with the wing of a blackcap in his lips, I braced myself for a gruesome story about how the man ate the bird live. Instead, David told us, the man was actually a conservationist sucking the sticky sap from the wings of a bird that had been stuck in a glue trap.

Napkin Notes by Garth Callaghan

A 44-year-old father with terminal cancer writes 826 notes on napkins to pack with his daughter’s lunches for everyday she has class, through high school.

(Source: mymodernmet, via beauxville)